oracle

Oracle Database Gateway 19c Deployment for SQL Server

I recently worked on a project to cross-platform migrate an Oracle database to SQL Server. There was a last minute dilemma in this project – the environment also leveraged an in-house application built on Oracle APEX (Application Express), which meant that in-house application cannot run on SQL SERVER. This application was essential to certain functionalities within the finance department and could not be retired, neither could we afford (development time + cost) to build an entirely new in-house application. I came up with the solution to implement Oracle Database Gateways to address the needs of such disparate data access.

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An Easy Approach To Oracle Database Security Assessment

Performing routine holistic database health checks is a must – good database administrators do more than just keep their database up to PAR . I perform these health checks on a quarterly basis to analyze database capacity/resource utilization, availability, performance, and security. Oracle Database Security Assessment Tool (DBSAT) just made my life alot easier and my health checks more effective. DBSAT is a command line tool focused on identifying how securely the database is configured, who are the users and what are their entitlements, what security policies and controls are in place, and where sensitive data resides with the goal of promoting successful approaches to mitigate potential security risks. DBSAT is a lightweight utility that will not impair system performance in a measurable way.

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Flashback An Oracle Data Guard Database

Logical mistake, end of testing cycle, need to rollback database to a previous state? RMAN restore can help, however there’s an easier way: we can address these scenarios with the Flashback technique. In the case of a standalone Oracle database, there is nothing special to take into account when performing flashback. However, performing flashback of a Data Guard environment needs special treatment of the Standby Database to ensure data consistency. This article will show you how to do that:

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Disabling Transparent HugePages On RHEL 7

Transparent HugePages (THP) memory is different from standard HugePages memory because the kernel thread allocates memory dynamically during runtime. Standard HugePages memory is pre-allocated at startup, and does not change during runtime. This dynamic memory allocation of THP can cause memory allocation delays during runtime. To avoid performance issues, Oracle recommends that you disable THP on all Oracle Database servers. Oracle recommends that you instead use standard HugePages for enhanced performance.

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